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14 feb 2008

Nutritional differences between young skiers living in sierra nevada (≥2300 M) and those residing elsewhere (

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The demands of training and competitions and the life style of sportspeople produce different energy and nutrient requirements and lead to modified nutritional habits compared with the rest of the healthy population These modifications are greater when the training is at altitude, especially if the sportspeople live at this height.

 
Autor(es): Mariscal-Arcas M (1), Rivas A (1), Murcia MA (4), Feriche B (3), Calderón-Soto C (2), Fernández de Alba MC (2) Olea- Serrano F (1).
Entidades(es): (1) Dpt. Nutrition and Food Science. University of Granada (2) Medical Service, Altitude Training Centre (CAR) of Sierra Nevada. Consejo Superior de Deportes(CSD-MEC) (3) Dpt. Physical Education and Sport. University of Granada.. (4) Dpt. Food Technology, Nutrition and Food Science. University of Murcia. Spain.
Congreso: I Simposio de Entrenamiento en Altura
Granada- 14-16 de Febrero de 2008
ISBN: 978-84-612-2278-8
Palabras claves: nutrients, anthropomorphic variables, study

Resumen

The demands of training and competitions and the life style of sportspeople produce different energy and nutrient requirements and lead to modified nutritional habits compared with the rest of the healthy population These modifications are greater when the training is at altitude, especially if the sportspeople live at this height. An observational study examined possible differences in nutritional habits between young skiers living in Sierra Nevada (≥2300 m) and those living at lower altitudes (<800 m). The study population comprised 288 federated young and adolescent skiers (6-12 yrs), including one group living at the ski resort (n=86) and another group that only trained there (n=202). Comparisons were conducted of anthropometric variables, energy, macronutrients and nutrients with antioxidant capacity, due to the importance of the latter at altitude. Statistical analysis (with SPSS 15.0) showed significant differences between the two groups in their weight (p=0.002), height (p=0.001), BMI (p=0.035) and vitamin C intake (p=0.004), with a larger amount (mean of 116.99 mg [SD:85.98]) consumed by those residing at ≥ 2300 m. These groups appear to be differentiated by anthropomorphic variables, with no differences in the intake of energy, macronutrients or micronutrients with antioxidant capacity with the exception of vitamin C. The nutrient needs of this population were covered in all cases.

 
 

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